Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast

In our twelfth episode of the Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast, Stewart Baker, Michael Vatis, and Jason Weinstein discuss this week in NSA: The President meets tech execs again on privacy and NSA; a decision/announcement on 215 changes seems imminent; Silliest Press Angle of the week: the press is shocked to hear government lawyers say that tech companies knew of PRISM intercepts; NSA "reaches into the past"; IBM denies helping NSA; NSA hacks Huawei; Brazil drops localization requirement, IL two-party consent law struck down, Gmail intercept class denied, settlement for victims who didn't suffer harm, Android user privacy/battery case advances, and additional stories: Ninth Circuit "Innocence of Muslims" ruling undermined by Copyright Office but enbanc denied; SSCI-CIA forensic review ordered. In our second half, we have an interview with Jim Lewis of the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Direct download: Episode_12.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:18am EST

In our eleventh episode of the Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast, Stewart Baker, Markham Erickson, Daniella Terruso, and Michael Vatis discuss this week in NSA: The EFF overrides one of the privacy protections in NSA's metadata program by killing the 5-year retention limit; what is the New York Times story on "raw take" about?; will the NSA and the telcos will end up going "Dutch," as in Ruppersberger; and Stewart brags about the results in his latest debate over Edward Snowden, who is starting to wear out his welcome with Americans; other fallout from the NSA leaks: Commerce announced its willingness to give up an oversight role for ICANN; members of the European Parliament start work on a data protection that they can't finish before elections; the legal claims in the SSCI-CIA brouhaha; the Silverpop case and how it may be harder to win a hacker-breach negligence case than some of us thought; this week in the Target breach case: Did Target miss a chance to stop the exploit?; privacy groups want to block the Whatsapp deal on privacy grounds; additional stories: the public's first good look at Russia's cyberespionage tools; Google starts encrypting search in China; Leon Panetta invokes "cyber Pearl Harbor;" and it turns out we could lose power for 18 months if a handful of substations are successfully attacked. In our second half we have an interview with Dan Novack, a former big-firm litigator now serving as legal analyst at First Look, the Greenwald/Omidyar news service.

Direct download: podcast_11.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:22pm EST

In our tenth episode of the Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast, Stewart Baker and Jason Weinstein discuss NSA/Snowden: Keith Alexander hints about a possible end to the broad collection of metadata---and the FISA court's refusal to extend the 5-year retention deadline for NSA's store of metadata. Was that ruling a defeat for NSA or the result of a clever litigation strategy? Roundup of Bitcoin news: What is going on here? Taking a second look at the copyright fight over "Innocence of Muslims", in wiretap news, the $21 million Justice Department claim against Sprint for overcharging on wiretaps, this week in cybersecurity policy: the Obama administration's approach is getting the most sincere form of flattery from other nations; China and Europe are once again living out the fantasies of American officials; except for the FTC, which as far as we can tell is already living in its own fantasy, riding a 50-plus streak of wins to a couple more victories, though one was closer than expected. In our second half we have an interview with Mark Weatherford, a Principal at the Chertoff Group.

Direct download: podcast_10.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:32am EST

In our ninth episode of the Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast, Stewart Baker, Michael Vatis, and Jason Weinstein discuss NSA/Snowden: NSA weighs options for 215 data and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence will not disclose the study of storage options; GCHQ's webcam captures; Canadian extradition flap; ABA President sends letter to NSA, LabMD falters, Cellphone unlocking - the long withdrawing roar of copyright maximalism begins, Holder calls for a national breach notice law - so why don't we have one?, Julie Brill's Princeton speech - big data and consumer privacy, Report from NSA: Trustycon and the boycott; What's hot - bot catchers and intelligence driven security, and this week in weird copyright law - what the Google/Islam/takedown decision means. In our second half we have an interview with Adam Sedgewick, Senior Information Technology Policy Advisor at the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Direct download: SteptoeCyberlawPodcast-009.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:16am EST

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