Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast

In this episode, Alan Cohn and Maury Shenk look at questions in Europe and elsewhere in Stewart’s absence. Maury delves into why Google was ordered to turn over foreign data accessible from U.S., a decision that seems at odds with the Microsoft Ireland case. Alan considers claims made by David Sanger and William Broad in The New York Times that U.S. blew up North Korea’s most recent missile test, and Jeffrey Lewis’s rebuttal in Foreign Policy.  Alan and Maury both remain skeptical.

Leaving the Korean peninsula, Maury discusses the current effort by EU data protection regulators to enact e-privacy regulations that would, among other things, put in place detailed standards for location tracking and content associated with metadata.  No surprises, but potentially more headaches for US industry.   And back on U.S. soil, Alan comments on the U.S. Justice Department’s apparent decisions to reconsider criminal charges against Wikileaks for the CIA cyber-tools leak.  Maury provides some color on the Trump Administration’s (lack of) views on Privacy Shield.

Finally, Alan reviews the bidding on dual-use export controls and cyber technologies, explaining both the most recent negotiations under the Wassenaar Arrangement and the EU’s efforts to amend its dual-use export controls to include cyber-surveillance technologies. 

As always, the Cyberlaw Podcast welcomes feedback. Send an email to CyberlawPodcast@steptoe.com or leave a message at +1 202 862 5785.

Direct download: SteptoeCyberlawPodcast-161.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:16pm EST